Issue - May/June 2022

U.S. DOMESTIC, MILITARY AND GOVERNMENT

Every Obstacle is an Opportunity

By Dante Vetri, Business Development, Moyer & Sons Moving & Storage, Inc.

In my experience, the biggest challenge to moving for the DoD and the U.S. government is peak saturation. I would love to see that evenly split up, where a single Soldier without dependents deploys outside of peak dates. If companies could have even distribution all year as opposed to four months a year, they could enjoy predictable workforce, planning projections, continuous education and positive reinforcement. It seems like the majority of the issues worldwide stem from over-saturation in peak.


Talent acquisition comes in a close second. As companies grow, It is always a challenge to recruit qualified, experienced talent familiar with DoD requirements. A bigger challenge is to take individuals with a great work ethic in the transportation industry and teach them to be great movers. Knowing the balance between seeding the veterans with the new recruits may be the way forward, to recruit outside of the box.


Lift Vans and SDDC standardized wood containers have us constantly thinking outside the box—no pun intended—to stay ahead. Lift vans are going to be utilized more often with the current driver shortage and challenges we face. We are all focused on proliferation and retention of these containers on a global scale. One immediate, single most powerful thing all agents can do across the board is screwing the doors in, instead of nailing them in. This will save all agents thousands in recoup fees for replacing doors and speed up the handling process. I would like to see an alternative material such as, for example, a light weight, durable polymer resin for the construction of the containers that would give them a longer life.


Trying to keep up with the ever-changing Tender of Service (TOS), Defense Transportation Regulations (DTR) and the 400NG Domestic Tariff can be a major challenge all by itself. I greatly appreciate the continuous education and reminders from the Van Lines and SCAC managers. I pay close attention to “procedure reminders and updates” emails. Also, the webinars from the industry leaders are the most powerful gifts of information and knowledge. Any time you can put yourself in the room with the greatest minds in the industry is time spent gaining precious knowledge. It also gives the service provider an opportunity to express our concerns. 


I see GHC as an opportunity, rather than as an obstacle. There has not been an open season to file domestic rates in my region for many years. In addition, there may be software and technology available to agents that would make the flow of information easier with robust integration and interface—this should make all communication happen in real time, significantly reducing emails and decreasing response time. I also like what I am hearing in regards to how quality gets rewarded; I am always confident of our services and abilities and that I can make a commitment to my agents or customers with pride, knowing with certainty that Moyer & Sons Moving & Storage will provide that kind of quality service. 


Electronic inventories present a major new challenge, but I see this as also a great opportunity to gain speed and efficiency, and as a development that will drastically reduce claims and the potential for abuse. Between faster inventory times, pictures, and check off procedures, this should be a win-win situation. Reweighs are always an issue for everyone, too. We do our best to set up systems, algorithms, and reminders, but at the end of the day, our drivers are aware—if you’re not sure, reweigh it anyway. 


Personally and as a company, we are grateful to the men and women of the U.S. Military who selflessly sacrifice in the highest expression of patriotism to protect our borders, country and interests. Any time we have the opportunity to make a soldier smile or take some level of burden or stress of their plate, that makes us feel fulfilled and honored to be a part of this moment in their lives.